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Posts Tagged ‘homemade baked goods’

Here I am one post back giving you some notes from my kitchen and I’ve screwed up already.  I got a number of complaints that I put up Steve’s inviting photo of sausage rolls from my December DeGustibus at Macy’s Cooking School class but then I didn’t offer the recipe.  I have now been appropriately chastised so here is the recipe.  It is not my recipe – it belongs to my English friend, Stuart Clarke.  He always serves these yummy rolls pre-dinner with cocktails.  And, always with ketchup – no fancy dipping sauces.  The DeGustibus class was holiday entertaining and I can tell you that not only were these a favorite of our guests, they were a big hit with the kitchen and cocktail crew.  Fortunately, we made a lot of them and were delighted to see every single piece gone by the end of the evening.

 

Makes 18 to 24 small rolls

          You will find some version of these rolls anyplace that the British have put down stakes.  They are snacks, cocktail treats, lunch staples or just a filling treat whenever hunger strikes.  They are quick to put together if you cheat and use ready-made pastry – puff pastry works extremely well – and sausage straight from the market.  You can also make these as large or as small as you want.

 

1 cup all-purpose flour, plus extra for rolling out dough

¼ teaspoon salt

6 ounces chilled unsalted butter, cut into ¼-inch cubes

½ cup cold water

1 pound pork breakfast sausage

3 tablespoons minced yellow onion

1 tablespoon minced fresh sage

1 teaspoon minced flat leaf parsley

1 large egg

 

Place the flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade.  Add the butter and, using quick on and off turns, process until the butter is incorporated into the flour in tiny balls.  With the motor running, slowly drizzle in ½ cup cold water, processing just until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl.  You may not need all the water.

Lightly flour a clean, flat work surface.

Scrape the dough out onto the floured surface.  Using a rolling pin, roll the dough out to a large rectangle.  Fold the two smaller ends up toward the center of the dough so that they meet but don’t overlap.  Turn the dough a quarter-turn and again roll out to a rectangle.  Repeat the folding process and then gently form the dough into a plump, but slightly flat circle.  Wrap in plastic film and refrigerate for 15 minutes.

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Line a baking sheet with a silicon liner or parchment paper.

While the dough is chilling, prepare the filling.

Remove the sausage meat from its casings.  Combine the sausage meat with the onion, sage and parsley in a medium mixing bowl.  Using your hands, smash the seasonings into the meat until well blended.

Place the egg in a small bowl and whisk to blend it well.  Set aside.

Lightly flour a clean, flat work surface.

Place the chilled dough in the center and, using a rolling pin, roll the dough out to a rectangle about 24-inches long and 5-inches wide.

Place the sausage meat down the center of the rectangle.

Using a pastry brush, lightly coat one long side of the dough rectangle with the beaten egg.  Pull the other long side up and over the sausage filling and pat it down onto the egg-washed edge to form a log shape.  Carefully turn the log over so that the seam is on the bottom of the roll.

Using a sharp knife, cut the log, crosswise, into as many 1-inch long pieces as you can.  It should be somewhere between 18 and 24.  Place the pieces on the prepared baking sheet, leaving at least 1-inch between each one.

Using the pastry brush and the remaining egg, lightly coat each roll with egg wash.  Carefully cut 2 slits into the top of the pastry, taking care that you do not cut down into the sausage.  At this point, you may freeze the sausage rolls for up to 3 months.

Transfer to the preheated oven and bake for about 25 minutes or until golden brown and cooked through.

Serve hot.

 

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I know I disappeared once before and then promised to do better about keeping my blogging moving ahead.  Then, it just seemed as though there was so much information and so many recipes and food talk online that what I had to add didn’t seem necessary.  So, once again, I shut down.  However, through this past year or so, friends kept asking me to return to the blog.  When I would ask why, the general answers seemed to be about the same – your recipes are easy, your comments light and comforting to novice cooks and fun to read.  Even those great cooks told me that they enjoyed my banter as much as they enjoyed seeing what I was cooking and why I was cooking.  All that to say as the pandemic is raging across the world, I’m back.  And, I dearly hope, here to receive plenty of comments from all of you who take the time to read my ramblings.  It’s you who make this all worth doing.

Here is a “Welcome Back” photo from my dear husband, photographer Steve Pool.  You can visit his work on his website www.stevepool.net – his show this past October was a sold-out event.  It features Sausage Rolls, a specialty of my dear friend, Stuart Clarke, and was taken at my December DeGustibus at Macy’s Cooking School class

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vegetable-chili

 

Everybody seems to have a favorite chili recipe, but I generally just wing it.  I do from time to time stick to my mom’s method (see a post from November 13, 2012) but as often as not I do some type of vegetarian chili.  Since the weather had cooled and I had a mess of cooked red beans on hand, I decided it was going to be easy to put dinner together.  I sautéed a big chopped onion and a few minced cloves of garlic in a little canola oil.  I added a large can of plum tomatoes (that I had squished), a medium can of tomato puree, a couple of dollops of tomato paste along with 4 chopped carrots, 2 chopped zucchini, 1 chopped red bell pepper, 1 minced jalapeño, and some mushrooms that were needing to be cooked.  To be honest the additions were based solely on what I had on hand.  Seasoned the mix with a good amount of seasoned chili powder, ground cumin, oregano, and red pepper flakes and, of course, salt and pepper.  Had I had some winter squash or sweet potatoes on hand I would have added either of those also.   I added the cooking liquid from the beans and then let the vegetable mix cook for a while before adding the cooked beans as they were already pretty soft and didn’t really need much more cooking.  I baked some corn muffins, quickly tossed a green salad, and Eh! Voila! dinner was on the table and we had lunch ready to go to our besties at Loupe Digital.

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Biscuits_IMG_3341

Perhaps more than any other dish I make, I get the most requests for my recipe for biscuits.  I’ve posted it on this site a couple of times, but since people are still asking, I’m once again posting.  I have been making them almost weekly all of my life so, although I am going to give you the recipe, I tend to make them by look and feel.  Once in awhile I goof and they are a bit too light and fall apart as soon as you pick them up.  And, once in awhile when I have too many kitchen kibitzers and I get to talking, I forget the baking powder which gives rock-hard lumps that get thrown to the deer.  But I usually hit the mark and a batch is finished up about as soon as it hits the table.  This is the basic recipe but, try to make it by feel also.  If the dough is a little sticky the biscuits will tend to be lighter and stay fresh longer.

2¼ cups all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons cornmeal
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon sugar or more to taste
½ to 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
½ cup vegetable shortening or butter if you want rich biscuits
Approximately ⅔ cup buttermilk
1 tablespoon butter for the pan

Preheat the oven to 425ºF.
Combine the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, sugar, and salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade.  Process, using quick on and off turns, to mix.  Add the shortening and again, using quick on and off turns, mix to just combine.  With the motor running, add the milk and process quickly to just blend.  The dough should be soft and slightly sticky.
Lightly coat a clean work surface with Wondra flour.  Scrape the dough from the processor bowl and lightly pat down and smooth edges with your hands.  You should have an uneven circle about ¾-inch thick.  Cut out circles using a 2-inch biscuit cutter or whatever else you have on hand – I often just grab a glass.
Place the 1 tablespoon of butter in a large cast iron skillet over medium heat to just melt.  Place the biscuits tightly in the pan.  Transfer to the preheated oven and bake for about 20 minutes or until the biscuits have risen and are lightly browned.  Remove from the oven and serve hot with plenty of butter and jam or pan gravy.

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