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Posts Tagged ‘global knife’

©Steve Pool Photography

          I don’t know when I first discovered pomegranates but it was sometime in my early teens.  I was hooked!  I loved their color, the piquancy of the arils, the messiness of pulling the fruit apart (I know, I know, there are some tidy methods of doing this but I like what I like!), the stains on my fingertips.  To this day, nothing can dissuade me from the thrill I feel when I first discover them arriving in the market…..usually long about now!  And the first thing I do is lean over my kitchen sink and begin pulling my purchase apart, almost slurping up the juicy arils as the colorful juice runs down my chin. 

          I rarely use them in cooking or baking — I just love pulling them apart and popping the arils – seeds, to me — between my teeth and feeling the juice explode on my tongue.  However, once in awhile I will patiently extract the arils and pile them up in a bowl to use in a salad, as a garnish or even in a stew.  Here is a salad in which they can shine.  It is perfect for fall.  It can stand on its own or be a side kick to almost any meat or game.

Wild Rice Salad

Serves 6

1 cup wild rice

Salt

½ cup low-fat plain yogurt

¼ cup hazelnut or walnut oil

¼ cup rice wine vinegar, preferably Japanese rice wine

½ teaspoon curry powder

¼ teaspoon minced ginger

1 cup julienned snow peas

¾ cup pomegranate arils plus more for garnishing if you like

½ cup julienned yellow bell pepper

½ cup chopped toasted hazelnuts

Pepper

          Rinse the wild rice and place in a bowl with cold water to cover for about 30 minutes or up to 1 hour.  Drain well and transfer to a medium saucepan.  Add 4 cups of cold water and season with salt.  Place over high heat and bring to a boil. 

          Lower the heat, cover and cook at a gentle simmer for about 45 minutes or until the rice is tender, but a bit chewy.  Remove from the heat and spoon into a colander.  Set aside to drain thoroughly.

          While the rice is cooking, prepare the dressing.

          Combine the yogurt with the hazelnut oil in a small mixing bowl.  Whisk in the vinegar.  When blended, whisk in the curry powder, and ginger.  Season with salt and pepper and set aside to allow the flavors to blend.

          When the rice is well drained, transfer to a serving bowl.  Toss in the snow peas, pomegranate, bell pepper and hazelnuts.  When well-blended, drizzle in the dressing, tossing to distribute evenly.

          Taste and, if necessary, season with salt and pepper. 

          Serve, as is, or with pomegranate sprinkled over the top or on a bed of greens.

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Rhubarb

 

The other day Steve, my photographer husband, had to shoot some rhubarb for a client. Since winter was still in the air, I wasn’t sure that I could find it. But, lo and behold, I found bright pink stalks stacked up at my local Whole Foods. Once he photographed it, I couldn’t let it go to waste. So, what does rhubarb say to me? Spring! Strawberries! Pie! But there really has been no sign of spring here in New York City – as March stilled its winds we still had snow in the air.

Besides, I really didn’t have enough rhubarb or strawberries to make anything significant. I cut what I did have into small pieces, added maybe a cup of sugar, a tablespoon or so of lemon juice, and grated a bit of fresh ginger into the mix. I popped it on the stove while we ate dinner and ended up with a lovely 10 ounce jar of rhubarb/strawberry compote that will be delicious over ice cream or yogurt, drizzled on roast pork or even on a slice of whole grain toast. But, most of all I had a taste of spring!

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Multitasking_R0011740

 

Steve loves this photo of me – why I don’t know.  But it might be because it amuses him and everyone I know that I can wield a knife and talk on the phone at the same time.  Looks like – in this instance – that I was putting together one of my impromptu fried rice meals, but I really don’t remember what I was doing.  I was probably on the phone with one of the many health professionals that have recently been part of our lives, but I could just as easily been gossiping with a friend.  I hope the photo amuses you as much as it does my family and friends.

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Global_Vegetables_DSC_3067

I grab whatever vegetables I have on hand and my trusty 8-inch Global chef’s knife and I chop away until I have a big pile of mixed vegetables (usually red bell pepper, carrots, potatoes, zucchini, green beans, celery, mushrooms) of somewhat equal size to throw in the soup pot for a massive amount of vegetable soup to warm up the kitchen on the first snowy day.  I’ve already placed a can or two of diced tomatoes, a can or two of cannellini or kidney beans, and some frozen lima beans, corn, and okra to the pot.  When I’ve added all the chopped vegetables I add enough water to bring the pot to the brim, season with salt and pepper, and cover just until it all comes to a simmer.  Then, I uncover and let the soup simmer away until the house is filled with sweet vegetal smells, the vegetables are tender, and the broth perfectly seasoned.  It doesn’t take too long and I have enough soup to fill us for days……

 

©Stephen Kolyer_Carrots

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Pizza

Pizza making can be a big, big job and it is one that I enjoy.  However, I got to thinking that there must be other ways to gather together all of the things that make pizza great without making the dough and the sauce and then deciding on the fixins’.  If you feel the same here’s what you do.  And, if you’d like to turn it into a breakfast or brunch dish, crack as many eggs as you have diners – but no more than 4 – on top along with some slices of prosciutto or ham nestled into the cheese (in this instance, gruyère can replace the mozzarella).  Eh, voila!

1½ cups 00 flour (if you can find it, if not use all-purpose)

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1¼ teaspoons instant dry yeast

⅔ cup warm water

2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil plus more for drizzling

1 cup grated mozzarella

1 small basket cherry tomatoes on the vine

A handful of black olives, pitted or not, your choice

A few bits of fresh rosemary

½ teaspoon red chili flakes, optional

A good sprinkling of freshly grated parmesan

Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in a mixing bowl.  Add the yeast, stirring to blend in.  Combine the water with 2 teaspoons of the olive oil.  Pour the water mixture into the flour mixture, beating to combine.  When blended scrape the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead with your hands for about 5 minutes or until smooth and elastic.

Oil a large bowl and place the dough into it.  Cover and let rest for 20 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 425ºF.

Line an 8-inch square baking pan with parchment paper, allowing the paper to cover the sides.  Set aside.

Lightly flour a clean, flat work surface.

Scrape the dough out onto the floured surface and, using a rolling pin, roll it out to about a 9-inch square.

Lift the dough up and fit it into the paper-lined pan, taking care to push the dough up against all sides of the pan.

Sprinkle the top with the mozzarella. (If using eggs and ham, use only half of the cheese, then break the eggs on top and nestle in the ham, finish with the remaining cheese.)  Lay the tomatoes randomly across the cheese.  Place the olives into the cheese and sprinkle the rosemary and chili flakes over the top.  Drizzle olive oil over the top and then generously top with grated parmesan.

Transfer to in the preheated oven and bake for about 15 minutes or until the cheese is melted and bubbly, the tomatoes slightly charred, and the dough golden brown.

Remove from the oven and let rest for about 5 minutes before cutting into squares.

Pizza_DSC_0404

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20130604_Global_tomato_knife_DSC_0766
My dear husband (who couldn’t even fry an egg if his life depended upon it) has for years coveted a tomato knife.  Well, the tomato knife fairy landed in our house and presented him with his very own signature knife and then he refused to use it.  He didn’t want to get it dirty!!!!!  So I did and, of course, Steve had to document me dirtying up his new toy while cutting lovely neat slices of a hot house tomato for sandwiches and delicate and oh! so sweet little Kumato tomatoes quartered for salad.  He quickly washed it clean and stored it in his hidden spot.  I now have to ask to borrow it when tomatoes are on the menu!

20130602_Global_tomato_knife_DSC_0720

20130604_Global_tomato_knife_DSC_0786

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Salmon Salad_9245

 

We have a dear friend who is battling a nasty illness and I keep trying to think of things that I can deliver to her that will entice her to eat and yet be healthy and healing.  Milk shakes always entice, but they sure don’t do the other tricks.  So, here’s what I did for lunch one day this past week.  I slivered a few leafs of organic kale and then blanched them very quickly in boiling water to soften slightly while keeping the bright green color.  I dried them thoroughly in the salad spinner and then tossed them with some slivered fresh red bell pepper and a handful of toasted almond pieces.  I removed the skin from a nice fatty piece of wild caught salmon and gave it a quick sear – just enough to cook it around the edges.  Then, I dressed the kale salad with a tiny bit of citrus vinaigrette and placed the warm salmon on top of it.  As speedy as a bunny I ran it up the block.  I stayed with her and got such pleasure watching her enjoy her lunch – can you think of anything better for you than salmon and kale and almonds – if only that alone could heal.  But, I know it does help.  (You will note that Steve was fascinated with my Global knife handle reflecting the salmon skin.)

 

Salmon_9233

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